SF Bay Area: Get Stanford Some Healthy Controls!

SHAPE Lab Tech(Oscar Ortiz) draws blood from a Army soldier(Karla Bayles).

If you live in the San Francisco Bay Area, or know any others who do, please consider asking them to donate blood to the Stanford Genome Technology Center as a healthy control. The blood will be used for multiple purposes, including in Ron Davis‘s ME/CFS research.  If you know individuals who are happy to help others in the SF Bay Area, please let them know that a half-an-hour of their time can potentially help millions of people!

We’re looking for healthy controls between the ages of 18 and 75.  A healthy individual would not have any serious health condition, such as diabetes or heart disease, even if it is managed with medication.  We are also looking specifically for individuals who do not have family members who have ME or fibromyalgia.  If you have ME, please don’t ask blood relatives to donate as healthy controls.

We are doing our best to schedule people by age group!

Tomorrow, Wednesday, March 8, we are collecting from individuals between the ages of 26 and 35.

Monday, March 13 — We are collecting from individuals between the ages of 36-45.

Wednesday, March 15 — We are collecting from individuals between the ages of 46-55.

We are collecting from all ages — please follow the instructions in the link below in order to schedule a blood draw!

Click here to see how to schedule a draw right now.

Additional Information:

  1. Please eat something a few hours before you arrive.
  2. The only way to ensure there will be enough time for your appointment is to contact the scheduler.  (We would love it if individuals just showed up, but we cannot guarantee we’d have time for everyone in that case, and cannot say how long you might wait.)
  3. If you schedule your visit, it should take no more than a half-an-hour — 15 minutes to sign a consent form, and 15 minutes for the draw.
  4. You will receive a small gift card for your time… along with the glow of having done something that is genuinely good.

One of the often-overlooked aspects of research is the gathering of data from healthy controls. Without healthy controls to compare to, there is no research! Please help us out by passing this along to friends and acquaintances.



You can also see the event on EventBrite here.

Please SHARE on social media to get the word out.  Thank you so much for all you do!


Categories: Actions, Featured actions, Medicine, Research, Science, United States

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2 comments on “SF Bay Area: Get Stanford Some Healthy Controls!
  1. Christopher Jannini says:

    Acronyms DO NOT help anyone if the intended audience is unfamiliar with whatever it is the letters stand for !!!!!!!

    What the hell is ME or CFS. There is a whole world of people out here who do not live in your ME/CFS world & who have no clue to what you are referring.

    I’d be glad to help if I knew what it was I was being asked to help.

  2. Lydia says:

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

    From Wikipedia:
    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) is a chronic, inflammatory, post-viral, primarily neurological disease that is multisystemic, i.e. affecting the central nervous system (CNS), immune system, cardiovascular system, endocrinological system, and musculoskeletal system. It has been classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a neurological disease since 1969. An M.E. Support article The Symptoms of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis covers cardinal symptoms, secondary features, and characterized symptoms. A hallmark symptom of ME, Post-exertional malaise, is intolerance to previously trivial effort such as walking to the mailbox, running an errand or grocery shopping, taking a shower or brushing teeth, and deterioration of health from persistent or repeated exertion.[5][6][7][8][9][10][11] Myalgic encephalomyelitis is usually a relapsing-remitting disease with new symptoms occurring either in discrete relapses (or “crashes”) or accruing over time.[12] The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) states: “Symptoms and their severity can fluctuate over the course of the illness, even from hour to hour.”[13] The US National Institutes of Health notes that sensitivity to noise, light and chemichals may force patients to withdrawal from society.[14]

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