Rehmeyer and Tuller: PACE trial didn’t prove graded exercise safe for CFS

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on email

Journalists Julie Rehmeyer and Dr. David Tuller have published an analysis concluding that the PACE trial failed to demonstrate the safety of graded exercise therapy, despite its authors claiming that it was a safe treatment for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).
Their article, on Virology Blog, concludes that “the PACE researchers’ attempts to prove safety were as flawed as their attempts to prove efficacy” and that the study authors did not provide sufficient information to support their claims.
Rehmeyer and Tuller note that the experience of patients in the UK, where the therapy is commonly prescribed, indicates that graded exercise therapy (GET) can be “very, very bad”. They cite a  survey conducted by the UK’s ME Assocation in 2015 in which 74% of patients who had tried GET said that it had made them worse.
However, Rehmeyer and Tuller point out that a randomised trial carries more weight than a survey and so safety should have been a central issue in PACE.
But, they say, “after the trial began, the researchers tightened their definition of harms, just as they had relaxed their methods of assessing improvement”. Also, they point out that therapists in the GET arm of the trial were instructed to tell patients to “consider increased symptoms as a natural response to increased activity”, which Rehmeyer and Tuller consider “a direct encouragement to downplay potential signals of physiological deterioration”.
They cite ME patient and published PACE-critic Tom Kindlon, who points out that the researchers abandoned the actometers — electronic activity-monitors — that they had planned to use to assess outcomes. He says that it is therefore impossible to know whether GET patients in the trial complied with the therapy and became more active, or whether they instead did more “exercise” at the expense of activities of daily living, as other GET studies using actometers with CFS patients have found.
“Clinicians or patients cannot take from this trial that it is safe to undertake graded exercise programs,” Kindlon told Rehmeyer and Tuller. “We simply do not know how much activity was performed by individual participants in this trial and under what circumstances; nor do we know what was the effect on those that did try to stick to the programs.”
Rehmeyer and Tuller also quote University of Columbia biostatistician Professor Bruce Levin, who said, “I would be very skeptical in recommending a blanket statement that GET is safe…. There is real difficulty interpreting these results.”

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Share on google
Google+
Share on email
Email

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Latest News

#MEAction Hosts an Artist’s Salon During #MillionsMissing

#MEAction Hosts an Artist’s Salon During #MillionsMissing

Activism comes in many forms, and #MEAction recognizes the significant role that art can play, not only as healing and cathartic expression, but as a powerful tool to move hearts and drive change. The ME community is host to talented artists all over the world, and we wanted to celebrate their gifts by hosting a

Read More »
woman raising four fingers

CDC releases post-COVID guidance: 4 takeaways for ME/CFS

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has published interim guidance for evaluating and caring for patients with post-COVID conditions.* The CDC will present this guidance to clinicians on a public COCA Call on Thursday, June 17th from 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM ET. This guidance deserves a detailed review of what has

Read More »
Graphic of people sitting on stools having a discussion

Cochrane redux

Get caught up!  Start with Cochrane Analysis: What’s Here, What’s Missing, Conclusions What has gone on before Cochrane Reviews are well-known systematic reviews of studies in healthcare, and are internationally recognized — enough to be considered the last word in healthcare as far as some medical publications are concerned.  In 2019, Larun et al. wrote

Read More »

Help keep our work going

We rely on donations from people like you to keep fighting for equality for people with ME.

Donate

Get actions alerts and news direct to your inbox

You can choose what you want to be kept up to date on.

Subscribe
Scroll to Top