Rehmeyer and Tuller: PACE trial didn’t prove graded exercise safe for CFS

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on email

Journalists Julie Rehmeyer and Dr. David Tuller have published an analysis concluding that the PACE trial failed to demonstrate the safety of graded exercise therapy, despite its authors claiming that it was a safe treatment for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).
Their article, on Virology Blog, concludes that “the PACE researchers’ attempts to prove safety were as flawed as their attempts to prove efficacy” and that the study authors did not provide sufficient information to support their claims.
Rehmeyer and Tuller note that the experience of patients in the UK, where the therapy is commonly prescribed, indicates that graded exercise therapy (GET) can be “very, very bad”. They cite a  survey conducted by the UK’s ME Assocation in 2015 in which 74% of patients who had tried GET said that it had made them worse.
However, Rehmeyer and Tuller point out that a randomised trial carries more weight than a survey and so safety should have been a central issue in PACE.
But, they say, “after the trial began, the researchers tightened their definition of harms, just as they had relaxed their methods of assessing improvement”. Also, they point out that therapists in the GET arm of the trial were instructed to tell patients to “consider increased symptoms as a natural response to increased activity”, which Rehmeyer and Tuller consider “a direct encouragement to downplay potential signals of physiological deterioration”.
They cite ME patient and published PACE-critic Tom Kindlon, who points out that the researchers abandoned the actometers — electronic activity-monitors — that they had planned to use to assess outcomes. He says that it is therefore impossible to know whether GET patients in the trial complied with the therapy and became more active, or whether they instead did more “exercise” at the expense of activities of daily living, as other GET studies using actometers with CFS patients have found.
“Clinicians or patients cannot take from this trial that it is safe to undertake graded exercise programs,” Kindlon told Rehmeyer and Tuller. “We simply do not know how much activity was performed by individual participants in this trial and under what circumstances; nor do we know what was the effect on those that did try to stick to the programs.”
Rehmeyer and Tuller also quote University of Columbia biostatistician Professor Bruce Levin, who said, “I would be very skeptical in recommending a blanket statement that GET is safe…. There is real difficulty interpreting these results.”

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Share on email
Email

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Latest News

In Memory of Dr. Ronald G. Tompkins MD, ScD

Mourning the loss of Dr. Ron Tompkins

Today #MEAction joins the community in mourning the loss of Dr. Ronald G. Tompkins, MD, ScD, who passed away this week. Ron Tompkins was a clinician, clinical researcher, and friend and ally to people with ME. He was the Sumner M. Redstone Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School, Founding Director of the Center for

Read More »
National Institutes of Health campus buildings from above

NIH Long COVID research lacks clear plan to identify and track ME/CFS

MEAction has written to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) expressing our deep concern that the RECOVER Initiative research agenda lacks a clear plan for how to accurately identify or consistently track the onset of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) cases among patients with Long COVID. This is of particular importance because a sizable fraction

Read More »

The Last Two Years Changed the World…

What a year 2021 was! People with ME have always faced formidable challenges: every day combatting stigma, lack of understanding from clinicians, NIH’s and CDC’s low budgetary commitments, and a world of challenges navigating disability on top of symptoms.  It’s no exaggeration to say that 2020 and 2021 changed the world – and the world of chronic,

Read More »

Help keep our work going

We rely on donations from people like you to keep fighting for equality for people with ME.

Donate

Get actions alerts and news direct to your inbox

You can choose what you want to be kept up to date on.

Subscribe
Scroll to Top