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OMF Creates Harvard ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center

Categories: All News, Global, Research, Science

The Open Medicine Foundation (OMF) is proud to announce that it has funded $1.8 million for the establishment of a new ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center at the Harvard Medical School affiliated hospitals, which includes Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

 The new Harvard Center will be led by OMF Scientific Advisory Board members Ronald G. Tompkins, MD, ScD, and Wenzhong Xiao, PhD, of Harvard University and will work synergistically with the ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center at Stanford led by Ronald W. Davis, PhD, of Stanford University, also funded by OMF. All science funded by OMF continues to be under the overall direction of our Scientific Advisory Board, directed by Ron Davis.

The goals for this new Harvard Collaborative Center are twofold. First is a basic research goal: to collect molecular data on muscle and other tissues affected by ME/CFS. Studies will include evaluation of patient muscle biopsies as compared to controls including genomics, proteomics, and ultrastructural analysis. Dr. Tompkins has extensive experience with such analysis on tissue from burn patients. He will be able to perform muscle biopsies, and possibly biopsies of other tissue types, greatly expanding the research, which has so far involved the analysis of blood cells. One focus of this new work will be to investigate the etiology of Post-Exertional Malaise (PEM).

The second goal is to establish a Clinical Trials Network to facilitate multi-center clinical studies on potential effective treatments for ME/CFS. The clinical resources at the MGH under Ron Tompkins, MD, are very extensive, making this an ideal site for overseeing and conducting clinical studies. This is a great opportunity to establish standards and the infrastructure for rigorous clinical trials.

Stanford ME/CFS Data Management and Coordination Center:

OMF is also funding the expansion of the Stanford Data Center for the Severely Ill Patients (SIPS) Study to encompass all the data from the Stanford and Harvard ME/CFS Collaborative Research Centers, as well as data from any other research we are funding.

The clinical results from the SIPS are currently already open to researchers with access via our website. This expanded data center will give researchers quick access to massive amounts of research data.

Categories: All News, Global, Research, Science

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5 comments on “OMF Creates Harvard ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center
  1. Lisa Harms says:

    This is great news! Thank you so much to the anonymous donor, what a gift you have given us! I’m so pleased to see the direction of their research, beyond the analysis of blood cells and to see Ron Davis, PhD involved. I am not a scientist but have struggled with this consuming illness for 32 years and am pleased to see more research into PEM. I believe it holds a key to understanding ME/CFS that will lend itself to treatment someday. And who can’t be excited about a Clinical Trials Network? We desperately need that. Thank you to all involved for devoting your time and work to this long neglected illness.

  2. I am obliged for this informative blog. This is very helpful for my research studies as I am preparing for Clinical Research fellowship, it is beneficial for me.Thank you once again.keep sharing such informative blogs

  3. Its a good move from OMF, we have to focus on Clinical Research trails for the improvements in Drug.
    thanks for sharing this great news.

  4. Snehal yadav says:

    Clinical trials contribute to information and progress in treating and preventing diseases. initial and foremost participants will facilitate others by contributive to medical information and rising public health.

  5. Snehal Yadav says:

    Clinical trials contribute to information and progress in treating and preventing diseases. initial and foremost participants will facilitate others by contributing to medical information and rising public health. Further, a participant doesn’t ought to be a patient diagnosed with a particular sickness or pathological state as some clinical trials, specializing in safety, can embody healthy volunteers.
    Thanks for your post.

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