Australian research into ME/CFS in adolescents

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on email

Neurological biomarkers in paediatric ME/CFS

ME Research UK is contributing nearly $100,000 (£46,000) to a study looking for neurological biomarkers in adolescents with ME/CFS.
Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, at The Royal Children’s Hospital in the University of Melbourne, Australia is conducting the study.
It will study 25 adolescents diagnosed using the Canadian Clinical Criteria adapted for paediatricians and 25 matched healthy controls.
Both groups will have baseline functional neuroimaging, followed by 90 minutes of structured effortful thinking and learning activities (similar to school work), then have another brain scan.
Neuroimaging techniques have rarely been applied to understanding the impact of ME/CFS on the function of the developing brain. Now Dr Sarah Knight and colleagues in Melbourne will examine how the brain and its underlying functioning responds to mental exertion in adolescents with ME/CFS, using a variety of neuroimaging techniques.
There is good evidence of difficulties with memory, concentration/attention, and information processing in adults with ME/CFS (read a review) but little known about young people, particularly the role of mental exertion in worsening these symptoms.
The study began earlier this year and is expected to be published in 12-24 months.
Research into children and adolescents is important. As around 9,000 people under the age of 16 in the UK have the diagnosis and many more around the world. (figures from ME Research UK)

“Illness in youngsters has a particular poignancy; the transformation of a bright, active child into one who is unable to go to school or play with friends is something that touches us all. The report to the Chief Medical Officer in 2002 put it very well – the illness represents a substantial problem and potentially threatens physical, emotional, and intellectual development of children and young people, disrupting education and social and family life at a particularly vulnerable time of life.” – ME Research UK

ME Research UK put out an international call for biomedical research applications last year, and this was one of the applications which came in from very reputable institutions.
“Although we have funded mainly in the UK previously, we have funded internationally also – namely in Canada, Belgium, Sweden and Australia. We fund on the basis of the merit of the research application and not national boundaries”, explained Dr Neil Abbot, Research & Operations Director, ME Research UK.
More on ME Research UK’s neurological biomarkers research.
Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, University of Melbourne, Australia
In and outside the UK you can donate to ME Research UK

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Share on google
Google+
Share on email
Email

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Latest News

#MEAction activists outside Scottish Parliament

Scottish Election! Ask your MSPs to support people with ME

If you live in Scotland, please join our campaign to ask your MSPs to pledge their support for people with ME. Email your MSPs The Holyrood elections are coming up on 6 May 2021 and we want to make sure that MSPs are aware of ME and the desperate need for support. There are more

Read More »
Terri Wilder - #MEAction Activist Camp

#MEAction’s ACTIVIST CAMP! – the Highlights!

It’s a wrap! Last weekend concluded the final session #MEAction’s first ever ACTIVIST CAMP!, a teach-in series for activists in the United States. We are so proud of this program and what it has accomplished. Congrats to our new grads!  #MEAction ACTIVIST CAMP! aimed to deepen our campers’ engagement with activism – teaching our collective

Read More »

Help keep our work going

We rely on donations from people like you to keep fighting for equality for people with ME.

Donate

Get actions alerts and news direct to your inbox

You can choose what you want to be kept up to date on.

Subscribe
Scroll to Top