Stanford: Women's immune system genes are different from men's

Using a new technology that allows the sampling of living T-cells in real time, researchers at Stanford University have found that men and women turn on and off immune system genes differently.
This may help explain the much higher incidence of autoimmune diseases like scleroderma, lupus, and multiple sclerosis among women. It may also help explain why more women than men have ME. (70-80% of ME patients are women.)
[pullquote align=”full” cite=”” link=”” color=”#E6443D” class=”” size=””]The single greatest predictor for genes’ tendency to turn on and off was the sex of the person.[/pullquote]

Across the 12 healthy volunteers, 7 percent of the genes were switched on in different patterns from person to person. For each person, these patterns persisted over time, like a unique fingerprint. “But the single greatest predictor for genes’ tendency to turn on and off was the sex of the person. In terms of significance,” said Chang, “sex was far more important than all the other things we looked at, perhaps even combined.” When the team measured gene activity levels from 30 of the top 500 genes the researchers expected would show gender-influenced activity, they found that 20 of the 30 genes showed significant differential activity between men and women.

 
 
[button_color url=”http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-07/sumc-wis072715.php” content=”Read the full article” target=””]

Facebook
Twitter
WhatsApp
Email

Latest News

Text across top of image reads: "Experts in infection associated chronic illness" with "WE WANT YOU!" bolded below it. Hand with finger pointed out at viewer. "Apply now" buttons to the left and right with mouse cursor clicking on them.

Infection-associated chronic disease experts needed at ARPA-H

Congress launched ARPA-H (the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health) this past March to focus on high-risk, high-reward research projects with the goal to solve intractable health problems. As ARPA-H is in the process of hiring its first cohort of program managers, #MEAction and a coalition of chronic disease advocacy groups have published an open

Read More »

BOLD ACTION is a Commitment to Healthcare Justice for People with ME

BOLD ACTION to me, means mobilizing our community to publicly demonstrate our deep and intense—as opposed to shallow and passive—commitment to seeing healthcare justice for people with ME. It is about bringing our issues to the forefront of public consciousness and putting strong pressure on our leaders to act. Taking BOLD ACTION is both a

Read More »

Help keep our work going

We rely on donations from people like you to keep fighting for equality for people with ME.

Donate

Get actions alerts and news direct to your inbox

You can choose what you want to be kept up to date on.

Subscribe
Scroll to Top